South Dakota attorney general removed from office over fatal crash

“There’s no question that was a lie,” said Sen. Lee Schoenbeck, the chamber’s top-ranking Republican. “This person ran down an innocent South Dakotan.”

Schoenbeck also criticized Ravnsborg for declining to testify in his own defense, saying Ravnsborg should have shared “what the hell he was doing” the night of the crash.

“There’s a mic right there, and that’s a damn short walk,” Schoenbeck said.

The convictions required a two-thirds majority. Senators mustered the bare minimum of 24 votes to convict Ravnsborg on the first charge, with some senators saying the two misdemeanors he pleaded guilty to weren’t serious enough crimes to warrant impeachment. The malfeasance charge — Ravnsborg also asked investigators what data could be found on his cellphone from him, among other things — sailed through with 31 votes.

Votes to bar Ravnsborg from future office, taken on both counts, were unanimous.

Ravnsborg’s face showed little emotion throughout the votes, holding his hand over his mouth as he had for much of the trial, then writing on a notepad in his lap. He did not answer questions from reporters as he exited the Capitol.

Ravnsborg in September agreed to an undisclosed settlement with Boever’s widow.

Nick Nemec, Boever’s cousin who has been a constant advocate for a severe punishment for Ravnsborg, said the votes were “vindication.”

“It’s just a relief. It’s been nearly two years that this has drug on and it just feels like a weight off my shoulders,” he said.

Ravnsborg is the first official to be impeached and convicted in South Dakota history.

Gov. Kristi Noem, who will pick Ravnsborg’s replacement until the candidate elected to replace him in November is sworn in, called for Ravnsborg to resign soon after the crash and later pressed lawmakers to pursue impeachment. As the saga dragged on, Noem publicly endorsed Ravnsborg’s predecessor, Republican Marty Jackley, for election as his replacement. Noem made no immediate comment on the Senate outcome.

Ravnsborg has argued that the governor, who has positioned herself for a possible 2024 White House bid, pushed for his removal in part because he had investigated ethical complaints against Noem.

As the impeachment trial opened Tuesday, prosecutors drove at a question that has hung over developments since the September 2020 crash: Did Ravnsborg know he killed a man the night of the crash?

“He absolutely saw the man that he struck in the moments after,” said Alexis Tracy, the Clay County state’s attorney who led the prosecution.

Prosecutors also told senators that Ravnsborg had used his title “to set the tone and gain influence” in the aftermath of the crash, even as he allegedly made “misstatements and outright lies” to the crash investigators. The prosecution played a montage of audio clips of Ravnsborg referring to himself as the attorney general.

Prosecuting attorneys probed Ravnsborg’s alleged misstatements during the aftermath of the crash, including that he never drove excessively over the speed limit, that he had reached out to Boever’s family to offer his condolence, and that he had not been browsing his phone during his drive home .

The prosecution played a series of video clips during their closing arguments that showed Ravnsborg’s shifting account of his phone use during interviews with criminal investigators. The attorney general at first outright denied he had been using his phone while driving, but then acknowledged he had been looking at his phone minutes before the crash. When it was time for senators to speak, several noted an accident reconstruction that found Ravnsborg’s car had seen entirely out of its lane, in contrast to his initial statement by him that he was in the middle of the road at the time of impact.

Ravensborg resolved the criminal case last year by pleading no contest to a pair of traffic misdemeanors, including making an illegal lane change and using a phone while driving, and was fined by a judge.

The attorney general’s defense asked senators to consider the implications of impeachment on the function of state government. Ross Garber, a legal analyst and law professor at Tulane University who specializes in impeachment proceedings, told senators to impeach would be “undoing the will of the voters.”

Ravnsborg was driving home from a political fundraiser after dark on Sept. 12, 2020, on a state highway in central South Dakota when his car struck “something,” according to a transcript of his 911 call afterward. He told the dispatcher it might have been a deer or other animal.

Investigators identified what they thought were slips in Ravnsborg’s statements, such as when he said he turned around at the accident scene and “saw him” before quickly correcting himself and saying: “I didn’t see him.” And they contended that Boever’s face had come through Ravnsborg’s windshield because his glasses were found in the car.

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